Essay

Breaking News, World News & Multimedia

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and PETER BAKER

  • “I would like to think that they didn’t know, but certainly they could have. They were there,” President Trump said.
  • The remarks amounted to an explosive suggestion at a time of heightened tension between the United States and Russia after the chemical attack in Syria.

By DAVID E. SANGER

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia sat down with Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson for his first face-to-face with a top official in the Trump administration.

By JEREMY W. PETERS and MAGGIE HABERMAN

A comment by Mr. Trump, “I am my own strategist,” was taken as ominous for the president’s chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, who is seen as increasingly isolated in the White House.

By MIKE McINTIRE

A shell company created by Paul Manafort the same day he left the presidential campaign quickly received
$13 million in loans from the businesses.

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Facing an outcry that included calls for his resignation, Sean Spicer said his remarks, in which he compared Hitler to President Bashar al-Assad of Syria, were “inexcusable.”

James Baldwin in 1964, attending the opening of his play “Blues for Mister Charlie” in New York.Robert Elfstrom/Villon Films, via Getty Images

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem has bought the author’s rich archive, but the private letters admirers have longed to read will largely remain under seal.

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

By KAREN ZRAICK and SANDRA STEVENSON

Here’s what you need to know at the end of the day.

By CHARLES McDERMID

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

By MIKE McPHATE

Plus, a plan to enhance voter clout.

By RORY SMITH

The video-streaming apps Virgin Anywhere and Sky Sports Mobile TV are a boon for a soccer reporter, or a fan.

By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

Scientists may have uncovered for the first time why taking deep breaths can be so calming.

By PATRICK KINGSLEY

The government has fired or suspended about 130,000 people suspected of being dissidents from the public and private sectors since a coup attempt last summer.

By ALEXANDER BURNS and JONATHAN MARTIN

A narrower-than-expected victory in Kansas and an even tougher contest next week in Georgia are highlighting Republicans’ troubles with affluent white voters.

By JIM RUTENBERG

Shonda Rhimes of “Scandal” and the people behind “Veep,” “Madam Secretary” and “House of Cards” talk about reality bumping into fiction.

By FARHAD MANJOO

Silicon Valley prides itself on its capacity to upend entrenched industries. But airlines have eluded tech disruption.

The Interpreter brings sharp insight and context to the major news stories of the week. Sign up to get it by email.

All he did was make a bizarre and disgusting comparison between Assad and Hitler. Why is everyone so upset?

By HOWARD AXELROD

Identifying myself as disabled never felt right. A friendship with Oliver Sacks helped me understand why.


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